July 8, 2020
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Top 15 US cities to work at home

Top 15 US cities to work at home

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The coronavirus pandemic forced many people to work at home endlessly – in mid-May 68% of Americans still working from home to avoid the virus. For some employees, such an arrangement may become permanent.

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Several large technology companies have announced that they will either significantly weaken or approve their current teleworking policies. And other companies may expect greater interest in remote control from employees. About half of employees found that they like working from home, regardless of the pandemic.

If you end up taking on remote work or your current concert decides to provide you with the ability to remotely communicate on an ongoing basis, one of the most important decisions you can make is where you live and work. If your home duplicates your office, you will need two things: enough space and reliable internet.

Based on these two criteria, Grow decided to determine the best cities in America for remote workers. To do this, we examined the rental data provided by the RentCafé property listing service and the data on Internet accessibility from the website of the comparison and research of the Internet provider BroadbandNow. Using RentCafé data, we determined the average monthly rent and area per tenant for apartments in 113 of the largest cities in America. Then these figures were compared with the access of these cities to broadband Internet for less than $ 60 per month.

Top 15 US Cities for Remote Workers

1. Toledo, Ohio

  • Broadband access for $ 60 or less: 98%
  • Area per person: 598 square feet
  • Rental per person: $ 547 / month
  • Average number of people per apartment: 1.3

2. Fort Wayne, Indiana

  • Broadband access for $ 60 or less: 85%
  • Area per person: 592 square feet
  • Rental per person: $ 537 / month
  • Average number of people per apartment: 1,5

3. Columbus, Ohio

  • Broadband access for $ 60 or less: 96%
  • Area per person: 591 square feet
  • Rental per person: $ 640 / month
  • Average number of people per apartment: 1,5

4. Lubbock, Texas

  • Broadband access for $ 60 or less: 93%
  • Area per person: 567 square feet
  • Rental per person: $ 599 / month
  • Average number of people per apartment: 1,6

5. Tacoma, Washington

  • Broadband access for $ 60 or less: 86%
  • Area per person: 551 square foot
  • Rental per person: $ 564 / month
  • Average number of people per apartment: 1,5

6. Pompano Beach, Florida

  • Broadband access for $ 60 or less: 83%
  • Area per person: 590 square feet
  • Rental per person: $ 584 / month
  • Average number of people per apartment: 1,5

7. Cincinnati, Ohio

  • Broadband access for $ 60 or less: 93%
  • Area per person: 656 square feet
  • Rental per person: $ 758 / month
  • Average number of people per apartment: 1.3

8. Memphis, Tennessee

  • Broadband access for $ 60 or less: 72%
  • Area per person: 671 square feet
  • Rental per person: $ 602 / month
  • Average number of people per apartment: 1.4

9. Indianapolis, Indiana

  • Broadband access for $ 60 or less: 81%
  • Area per person: 641 square foot
  • Rental per person: $ 657 / month
  • Average number of people per apartment: 1.4

10. Boise, Idaho

  • Broadband access for $ 60 or less: 97%
  • Area per person: 678 square feet
  • Rental per person: $ 896 / month
  • Average number of people per apartment: 1.3

11. Garland, Texas

  • Broadband access for $ 60 or less: 93%
  • Area per person: 461 square feet
  • Rental per person: $ 575 / month
  • Average number of people per apartment: 1.9

12. Arlington, Texas

  • Broadband access for $ 60 or less: 94%
  • Area per person: 463 square feet
  • Rental per person: $ 589 / month
  • Average number of people per apartment: 1.8

13. Hollywood, Florida

  • Broadband access for $ 60 or less: 72%
  • Area per person: 516 square feet
  • Rental per person: $ 505 / month
  • Average number of people per apartment: 1.7

14. Fort Lauderdale, Florida

  • Broadband access for $ 60 or less: 76%
  • Area per person: 601 square feet
  • Rental per person: $ 613 / month
  • Average number of people per apartment: 1,6

15. Columbia, South Carolina

  • Broadband access for $ 60 or less: 74%
  • Area per person: 629 square feet
  • Rental per person: $ 630 / month
  • Average number of people per apartment: 1,6

Accordingly, remote work is a popular option in many of these places. Some of these cities pop up on Moneypenny Analysis for example, from cities with the most remote workers released in February based on census data. Tampa and Boise appear in the top 15: approximately 7% of the population of each city works at home.

Several cities on our list – suburbs or satellites of larger and more expensive cities on the MoneyPenny list, Arlington and Garland are in the Dallas Fort Worth Metroplex, while Tacoma is a suburb of Seattle. Fort Lauderdale, Hollywood and Pompano Beach are an hour’s drive from Miami.

Between 2017 and 2018 in Boise, Lubbock, Columbus, Cincinnati and Memphis, according to MoneyPenny, one of the fastest growing home workers in the country.

The fact that six of the 15 best Grow cities are in Texas or Florida makes sense: the states with the most remote workers are usually the states with the most people in them, and California, Texas, New York and Florida took first place in FlexJobs list. the states with the most deleted job listings since the beginning of 2019. If you decide to change your job and want to continue working from home, it is in these places that you will probably find the most opportunities.

In states with the highest proportion of remote workers, you can also find employers who are more comfortable working with remote workers. Colorado tops the list, according to 7.7% of homeworkers. Census BureauIdaho also appears prominently. Over 6% of Idaho employees work from home, and Boise – a growing technical center for people seeking to escape from Silicon Valley.

Not all remote employees can work anywhere.

One common misconception about remote work is that employers allow employees to do this from anywhere. In fact, 95% of remote jobs have some kind of geographic requirement, according to a recent survey from FlexJobs. These requirements, however, can vary greatly.

“Some companies will only hire employees in the state where they are located. Others hire staff in several, but not most, states. And some hire employees in almost every state, ”says Bree Weiler Reynolds, career development manager and trainer at FlexJobs. According to Reynolds, these geographical restrictions are usually associated with certification of jobs or licensing rules, as well as with different tax laws in different states, and they are usually not common in any particular industry.

When moving, experts say it’s also important to consider the tax situation in your new state and ask if your employer will help with relocation or living expenses.

Make sure your internet is accessible and fast enough

If you plan to work remotely, experts say that Internet connection and costs are a key factor to investigate before you move.

For most remote jobs, you do not need a very fast connection. According to Tyler Cooper, BroadbandNow’s editor-in-chief, if your work isn’t related to the operation and transfer of large files, such as databases or high-resolution media, you just need something fast and reliable enough.

“If we are talking about a family of five, and they are all at home, and they are studying at an online school, and the parents are trying to work, everyone is trying to do the same during the day, they share this bandwidth between them,” Cooper says.

If we are talking about a family of five, and they are all at home, and they are studying at an online school, and the parents are trying to work, everyone is trying to do the same during the day, they share this bandwidth. ,

Tyler Cooper

Editor-in-chief, BroadbandNow

In more than half of the 113 cities we analyzed, broadband at less than $ 60 per month is available in at least 70% of cities. However, there are a small but significant number of places where affordable broadband is much scarcer.

This includes cities like Boston and Seattle, where low-cost broadband is available to less than 8% of residents. In Denver, according to BroadbandNow, available broadband is not available.

If you are shopping for online plans and you need to sit down Cooper calls at any frequency, Cooper says it’s important to look at the provider’s download speeds, rather than the download speeds that are advertised more noticeably.

The average download bandwidth in every American city that analyzes Grow, with the exception of Albuquerque, is fast enough to support a single Zoom group conference in HD. However, depending on the needs of your family, this may not be enough, so be sure to read the fine print.

Define and separate your workspace to avoid burnout

“It is important to create a separation in your household that includes a space designed for work, and then when you leave your home and don’t think about work, you also have a place that you can enjoy, and you I feel that you are at home and you can have that kind of distance, ”said Angelina Darrisou, CEO and founder of C-Suite.

Darriso adds that maintaining this separation is a key factor if you want to prevent burnout and enjoy a relaxing holiday at home.

Video by Mariam Abdullah

If you rent and want to cut space itselfconsider Louisville, Kentucky and Winston-Salem, North Carolina, where a typical tenant has an area of ​​over 700 square feet. Residents of numerous cities on the list also get a lot of space. Tenants in Boise, Memphis, Cincinnati, Indianapolis, Tampa, Toledo, Columbus, Columbia, Fort Lauderdale, Pompano Beach and Fort Wayne receive an average of more than 590 square feet. In nine of these cities, the average tenant also pays less than $ 800 per month for rent.

AND 2018 Single Family Home Analysis by LendingTree found the cheapest homes, per square foot, could be found in Indianapolis and Memphis.

Remember that experts caution against buying a house in the city without spending at least a year there.

Ultimately, the needs of remote workers can vary significantly – some jobs require better connectivity, some people need more space and loneliness, and different people have different ideas about what a full-fledged social life looks like outside their home offices. For the work itself, all that most people need is enough space to carry it out and separate from the rest of their lives, as well as a pretty decent way to connect to the rest of the company. There is no shortage of cities in America that offer both.

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