July 12, 2020
AliExpress WW
The US first reported more than 40,000 cases of coronavirus in one day

The US first reported more than 40,000 cases of coronavirus in one day

AliExpress WW
Bar owner Petros Markantonis changes the area near his bar to
Bar owner Petros J. Markantonis changes the area near his bar to “Closed Again” at West Alabama Ice House in Houston, Texas, June 26, 2020.

MARK FELIX / AFP / AFP via Getty Images

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  • At least 40,173 new cases of COVID-19 were recorded on Friday, a new record. CNN reportedwith reference to data from Johns Hopkins University.

  • The number reported by The Washington Post was even higher, with over 44,000 new cases of COVID-19 recorded in one day.

  • “This is a continuation of the first wave,” Dr. Amesh Adal, senior fellow at Johns Hopkins University Health Safety Center, told Business Insider,

  • “In some places that could be relatively sparing in early winter and spring, there are more cases now than before,” Adaya said.

  • More than 124,410 people in the US have already died from coronavirus, according to Johns Hopkins University.

  • According to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the death toll by July 18 may reach 150,000.

  • Visit the Business Insider homepage for more information.,

At least 40,173 new cases of COVID-19 were registered on Friday, a new record, CNN reports citing data from Johns Hopkins University, which were higher than the daily total on Thursday, which exceeded 39,000.

According to The Washington Post, this figure was higher, and more than 44,000 cases with one-day treatment were reported. 44,702 new cases registered nationally on Friday broke the previous day’s record of 39,327 people.

Eleven states, from Florida to California, have broken records for the average number of cases recorded daily over the past week, according to The Post,

More than 124,410 people in the US have already died from coronavirus, according to Johns Hopkins University. According to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the death toll by July 18 may reach 150,000.

“This is a continuation of the first wave,” Dr. Amesh Adal, senior fellow at Johns Hopkins University Health Safety Center, told Business Insider, “In some places that might be relatively sparing in early winter and spring, there are more cases now than before.”

White House leadership suggests states should see either a two-week decline in cases or a two-week reduction in their proportion of positive coronavirus tests before reopening.

But in 18 of the 30 states that began to reopen on May 7, there is an increase in new cases daily, according to data from the New York Times, In nine out of 30 states, a reduction in the percentage of positive tests was not recommended. Six reopened without meeting any of the criteria: Utah, Iowa, Nebraska, Kansas, Oklahoma and Missouri.

“It’s important to remember that we never had complete control of this virus,” Adala said. “We got to the point where hospital capabilities were better and diagnostic testing was better, but we still have at least 20,000 cases per day.”

A sharp jump in the spread of the virus led to the fact that this figure exceeded 30,000, and no signs of stopping it were observed.

Vice President Mike Pence, however, emphasized positive on Friday, stating that he remains “encouraging, as the death toll is across the country.” In mid-April, more than 2,000 people per day died due to COVID-19; today their number is much less than 1000.

But although the mortality rate is far from their previous maximum, the lag rate is lagging, as California Governor Gavin Newsom noted on Friday. Over the past two weeks, the number of hospital admissions in the state has increased by 32%, he noted, and patients with coronavirus occupy more than a third of all available in intensive care units.

“We did not get out of the first wave,” Newsom emphasized. told CNN, “This disease does not take summer vacation.”

We finally see the delayed effects of reopening

It took several weeks for the consequences of re-discoveries to become apparent. This is because, in the meantime, it may take several weeks for someone to come into contact with the virus and when it starts to show symptoms or look for a test. From there, processing the test can take up to a week.

This surge in coronavirus cases is probably not a reflection of increased testing. At least seven states – Arizona, Arkansas, California, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee and Texas – reported their highest hospital admissions rates for COVID-19 this week, according to The washington post,

In Louisiana, Governor John Bel Edwards said the increase in the number of cases is “more than can rightly be explained by the increase in testing,” especially given the number of hospital admissions has increased dramatically along with the number of cases.

Moreover, the percentage of coronavirus tests returning to a positive result is currently growing in many states that have the largest spikes, such as Arizona, Texas, Florida, Oklahoma and Nevada – an indication that the number of infections rather than increased testing, are driving a surge. Nationwide, according to Johns Hopkins University,

This means hospitals can become overwhelmed again.

“When you see that the percentage positive trend is growing, it usually means that not every case is recorded by this system,” said Dr. Adal of Johns Hopkins University in an interview with Business Insider. “It really underlines the need for states to establish reliable contact tracking teams because you are preventing those chains from getting into your hospital.”

In Florida, an explosion of new coronavirus infections occurred – more than 8,900 cases were reported on Friday according to the Tampa Bay Times, breaking the previous record 5511 – pushed the staff to close the bar, which only recently opened.

Miami-Dade County in Florida reports that about 27% of tests return to positive results.

On Friday, Texas Governor Greg Abbott also signed an order to close drinking establishments and limit the number of visitors to seated restaurants. The state currently reports more than 10% positive testing.

“This is a paradigm shift because we are dealing with young people, people with an asymptomatic course, and people who become infected in a community and not in a flash when you know who to identify, isolate and contact the trace,” Dr. Anthony Fauci , director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said on Friday at the White House’s first coronavirus task force briefing in Friday.

“We are facing a serious problem in certain areas,” he added.

Florian Krammer, a professor of microbiology at Icahn School of Medicine on Mount Sinai, spoke in a sharp tone on Twitter.

“In April,” he wrote aboutn Twitter“I was starting to hope. In May, I thought we got this, at least until we had an effective countermeasure. Now the panic in February and March begins again. ”

Aria Bendix provided a report.

Read the original article on Business Insider


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